Best Recurve Bow For Hunting

Here are the best recurve bows for hunting. I’ve made sure to diversify the price ranges these bows were from, so no matter what your budget you are going to find one that is right for your particular needs.

I would really appreciate it if you would read all the information on this page to get a better understanding of why it is I chose these specific hunting recurves to list here. This will help you make a better decision that will allow you to enjoy your bow for many years.

Also, please be aware that all the models below can be used equally well for target practice; basically any hunting recurve is good for target shooting as well, though the opposite does not apply. This has to do with the draw weight: a hunting bow must be a minimum of 40#, while target shooting can be rewarding with even a 15# bow if shooting from a small enough range.

Hoyt Buffalo Recurve Bow

Hoyt-Buffalo-Recurve-Bow-Wood-Finish-Review
See Amazon.com's best price
Bear Grizzly Recurve Bow

Bear Archery® Grizzly Recurve
See Amazon.com's best price
Martin Saber Recurve Bow

Martin Saber Recurve Bow
See Amazon.com's best price
Martin Hunter Recurve Bow

martin-hunter-recurve-review-main-chart
See Amazon.com's best price
Bear Archery Super Kodiak

Bear Archery Super Kodiak Recurve Bow
See Amazon.com's best price
Bow length60 in58"64 in.62 in.60 in.
Bow weight3.2 lbs2.3 lbs3.4 lbs2.2 lbs3 lbs
Draw Weight45, 50, 55 lbs.50, 55, 60 lbs.30, 40, 45, 50, 55 lbs.40, 45 50, 55 lbs.50, 55, 60 lbs.
Take-Down?icon-yesNoicon-yesNoNo
Our ReviewOur ReviewOur ReviewOur ReviewOur Review

navigational help

What Makes a Recurve Bow Great For Hunting?

I don’t want to simply “force” some specific bows down your throat; I want you to actually understand why it is that I’ve chosen the bows listed above. With that in mind, here are the things that make a recurve great for a hunter.

1. It needs to be quiet

This is likely the most important thing to keep in mind. Nothing is more annoying than setting up for that perfect shot after an hour or two of tracking or luring your prey, only to have them run away due to the noise generated by drawing the string on your bow. So how do you solve this?

By choosing a bow that is specifically designed to minimize this kind of noise. These will include limbs made from specific, “quiet” material. They will be well tuned. They will include dampners or other elements designed to silence the string.

All of the recurve bows in the list above meet these criteria  - they are quiet and reliable. Obviously though, being “quiet” is not enough.

2. The draw weight needs to be just right

This one is a bit of a variable, but nothing we can’t handle.

I strongly recommend that you never use a recurve bow for hunting unless it has a drawing strength of 40 pounds or more. The reason being that, during hunting, you will want your arrow to pierce your prey and penetrate the body deeply enough. Unless your recurve has a draw weight of 40 pounds or more, and especially if you are shooting from further than 15 yards away, chances are you will just injure the animal without actually killing. It will then run away, needlessly suffer, and you’ll even lose your arrow. That’s not all though.

You need to choose a bow with a draw weight that you can handle. When hunting, you often need to draw your bow and then hold for a minute or longer before actually firing. If the draw weight is too much for your muscles, you will start to shake and your aim will suffer greatly. So how do you know what draw weight is enough for you?

Simple: if you have never fired a recurve bow before, simply go for 40-45 pounds draw weight at most. The vast majority of males can handle this quiet well, and I guarantee that you will only get stronger as time goes on, making it easier for you to handle considerably more draw weight. So to sum it up:

  • If new/uncertain, go for 40-45 pounds draw weight.
  • If experienced/have strong back muscles, go for 45+ pounds draw weight.
  • If you’re a teenager / have a small frame, go for 40 pounds, tops. You’ll improve soon enough.

3. It needs to be long

This one is simple: the longer the total lengh of the bow (from tip to tip), the more accurate your shots will be. How long exactly?

The best recurve bow for hunting will have a minimum length of 58 inches. The longer the better. You will notice that almost all of the recurves in the list above have a length of 60 or more inches – you now understand why.

4. Ease of transport should be considered

This may not seem like an issue for you now, especially if you have never used a bow before, but believe me – transporting a 60+ inche bow in a safe manner (you don’t want the limbs to get bent or worse – broken, do you?) can be a real hassle. Now, if you have a big enough car to transport your bow easily while avoiding damage to it in route, that’s great. Otherwise…

You need a takedown recurve bow for hunting. In case you didn’t know, a takedown bow is one where you can quickly detach the limbs from the riser simply by unscrewing a few screws. This makes storing and transporting your bow so much easier. So if you aren’t certain whether you can guarantee your bow safety in-transport, choose a takedown recurve.

That’s why I’ve included the “Takedown?” column in the chart above.

You Must Know Your Prey

Do you plan to hunt rabbits? Turkey? Deer? Bears? Elk?

deer hunting recurveFor instance, a 40 lbs draw weight bow will be enough to kill rabbits, turkey and deer even from a 30 yard distance (assuming your aim is on point, of course!). That same bow, however, may not prove as effective on that same distance if hunting for larger game, such as black bear or elk. With that in mind, here are some guidelines on how to make a decision:

  • If you want no constraints at all, pick a 50 lbs. draw weight bow.
  • If you are only going for smaller game (rabbits, turkey, deer), 40 lbs. will be more than enough.
  • If you’re not sure what you want to hunt for and/or have no experience, a 45 lbs. bow is the “sweet spot” you should go for.

You shouldn’t worry about it too much though. Even a 40 pounder is well-capable of taking down a bear for example, providing you shoot from a close enough range. You need to keep in mind though that often it won’t be possible for you to get too close to your prey, and that you’ll need to keep a distance of 20+ yards minimum in order not to scare the game away. The advice above keeps that in mind: it assumes you are shooting from a 20-30 yard distance.

Where to go from here?

I’d like to believe that I’ve done all the work for you in the hunting bow chart above. Basically, all you need to do is this:

  1. Decide on a budget.
  2. Refer to my advice above and specify what kind of draw weight you need on your bow.

Now just use to the chart above and pick the bow that meets your needs.

11 Comments

Add a Comment
  1. Very insightful. How do i choose draw length? Theres no archery clubs where i am and the local hunting shop dont seem too competent at the task

  2. Thank you very much for this information. It is very thorough. I have been looking everywhere and now I don’t have to look any further.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


one × 4 =

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Website by - Privacy Policy